Harris County Civil Court at Law No. 4

The County Courts in Texas were created under the Texas Constitution and are governed by the provisions of Chapter 25 of the Texas Government Code. A county civil court at law in Harris County has jurisdiction over all civil matters and causes, original and appellate, prescribed by law for county courts, but does not have the jurisdiction of a probate court. A county civil court at law has jurisdiction in appeals of civil cases from justice courts in Harris County.
A county civil court at law has exclusive jurisdiction in Harris County of eminent domain proceedings, both statutory and inverse, if the amount in controversy in a statutory proceeding does not exceed $200,000, excluding interest, statutory or punitive damages and penalties, and attorney’s fees and costs.

The County Courts in Texas were created under the Texas Constitution and are governed by the provisions of Chapter 25 of the Texas Government Code. A county civil court at law in Harris County has jurisdiction over all civil matters and causes, original and appellate, prescribed by law for county courts, but does not have the jurisdiction of a probate court. A county civil court at law has jurisdiction in appeals of civil cases from justice courts in Harris County.
A county civil court at law has exclusive jurisdiction in Harris County of eminent domain proceedings, both statutory and inverse, if the amount in controversy in a statutory proceeding does not exceed $200,000, excluding interest, statutory or punitive damages and penalties, and attorney’s fees and costs.

A county civil court at law also has jurisdiction to:
    •    decide the issue of title to real or personal property;
    •    hear a suit to recover damages for slander or defamation of character;
    •    hear a suit for the enforcement of a lien on real property;
    •    hear a suit for the forfeiture of a corporate charter;
    •    hear a suit for the trial of the right to property valued at $200 or more that has been levied on under a writ of execution, sequestration, or attachment;
    •    hear a suit for the recovery of real property.

The Judge of the County Court-at-Law is elected for a term of four years. Sec. 25.0014 of the Texas Government Code requires the judge of a statutory county court must be at least 25 years of age, a United States citizen, a county resident for at least two years before election or appointment, and be a licensed attorney in this state who has practiced law or served as a judge of a court in this state, or both combined, for the four years preceding election or appointment.

 

Pol. Adv by William “Bill” McLeod, Kirina McNamara. In compliance with the voluntary limits of Judicial Campaign Fairness Act.